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Frosty Hansen, GMI Missionary in Bolivia, shares the following exciting news with us concerning the progress of building the Bolivia Training Center in Santa Cruz. They are 80% of the way towards raising the funds needed to complete this much-needed training center to prepare future generations of church leaders. If after reading this the Lord is working in your heart to join the team of financial donors, you may click HERE for more information. Please pray for this project as they move through the construction phase. Exciting things are happening in Santa Cruz, Bolivia! 

This picture above was taken on August 23 when Frosty and his wife, Cathy, presented a check for half the cost of the new Training Center construction project to the owner of the construction company. On the far right next to Cathy is Pepe Yucra, the president of the MEB (the national denomination), who officially signed the contract with the architect/builders. Future payments will be made and money is being set aside for the costs of equipping the building (seats/desks, teacher desks with lecterns, acrylic boards, video projectors, air conditioning, bookshelves, and office furniture).

In the picture, we are standing in the MEB office, which will continue to be on the first floor of the building with the Training Center occupying the second floor. The Training Center will contain three classrooms (one large and two medium), a library, a restroom, an office for a receptionist, and an office for the director. It will be accessible by an interior stairway and an exterior ramp.

The work will begin this week with the removal of the roof, which was originally designed to be raised for a second floor.

Today I will begin classes for our current pastors who are in the Santa Cruz area in preparation for ordination. Each Friday evening in September and October we will meet for two hours for an overview of the different areas of systematic theology, beginning with the Bible. The classes will include practical application of the truths we are studying. Early next year we will begin studying Dispensational Theology, and then a series on Pastoral Theology as they get ready for the ordination process.

Twice a month I am meeting with students who are currently studying at other theological institutions to answer questions, specifically regarding what they are receiving in their classes as it compares with the doctrine of the Misión Evangélica Bethesda (MEB). They have asked to begin by looking at when the Church, the Body of Christ, began. I started with two weeks (1½ hours each) investigating the difference between the Church and Israel. On September 10 we will discuss various possibilities of when the Church began and look for biblical reasons for/against these options.

We are hoping to begin a broader array of classes for everyone after the first of the year. The construction should be completed by mid-December.

So let’s keep praying for this ministry! Pray for safety for the construction workers, a clear presentation of the lessons, more students, understanding of what is presented, and faithfulness in attendance so much is learned!

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Thanks to all who have prayed for the taekwando team Breakthrough, given financially, or sent messages of support. After 10 months of planning and preparation, the team is officially in Paraguay!

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” – Isaiah 6:8 (NIV).

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To see a video of the team doing their presentation in a gym setting, go to this link:

https://www.facebook.com/bautista.edu.py/?hc_ref=ARRSUh_WcqL_QsOFuGYYhPf2Dv6ls-c48tzh5n4Fw9ZVbD8fqo-MXr6sBj4zSS-l3Tc

 

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At the February 2013 board meeting, GMI adopted its 10-year ministry plan. Part of reaching the goals set is having more missionaries join the GMI family on the various mission fields. Below you can see the areas where there are specific opportunities to serve, but note under “General” there are areas we may not have thought of yet. Will you please pray with us for those individuals who God has for those areas of service? Could one of them be you?

General:
  • In addition to the specific needs we have listed below, we would ask you to pray that God would simply raise up missionaries to meet needs or expand works on existing and new fields which we have not even considered or thought of or we may not even know about yet.
Bolivia:
  • Bolivia is an established field with churches located in and around the cities of Santa Cruz, Cochabamba, and La Paz. In recent years, the Bolivian churches have recognized the need to have their own training center to equip men and women for ministry. We are looking for more teammates who will come alongside our current GMI missionaries and the Bolivian leadership to teach the Bible, theology, and ministry skills as we prepare godly pastors, leaders, and missionaries to expand the ministry to other regions of Bolivia and neighboring countries. 
Mozambique:
  • GMI missionaries Kennedy and Sofia Simtowe are returning to Mozambique in 2017 to continue to facilitate the process of church registration and to seek approval of their work permits. There are already a handful of churches in that country associated with the ministry of GMI organizing themselves into a national church structure. Kennedy’s emphasis will be church planting and evangelism. We need missionaries who can come alongside the churches and believers in Mozambique in order to better equip and provide further education for the pastors and church leaders. This would be similar to the ministry in Malawi, where GMI missionary Bill Vinton and GMI Partners Joseph Asong and Eric Mango are providing theological education for pastors and church leaders to edify the churches already established in this field.
Nicaragua:
  • Nicaragua became one of GMI’s fields early in 2014 when GMI missionaries, Jeff and Sally Roth, along with GMI Associate Missionaries, Emiliano and Raquel Seravalli, moved there to begin their ministries. Each week around 100 adults, youth, and children pass through Emiliano and Raquel’s home in the town of Nagarote for various Bible studies, worship services, clubs, and discipleship groups. Jeff and Sally took survey trips to the region in and around Matagalpa and have begun a new ministry in that area with the goal of planting churches. They have been joined by GMI missionaries Brett and Debby Chapman who host weekly Bible studies in their home.With two ministry sites, we need to increase our missionary force. We would like to see additional missionaries or missionary families with a desire to evangelize, disciple, and establish local churches work with our Nicaragua team in Nagarote or Matagalpa.
Paraguay:
  • Paraguay, located between GMI’S field of Bolivia and our affiliated field of Uruguay, is our newest field opened in June 2015, when GMI missionaries Alex and Deltha Gulart moved to Ciudad del Este to begin their evangelism and teaching ministry. We are looking for even more teammates to come alongside and complement them and GMI missionaries Jerry and Sandi Bomers as we strive to plant churches in Paraguay. We are looking for individuals with a heart to disciple new believers and help establish them into local churches. The goal of the ministry in Paraguay is to plant churches in Ciudad del Este, throughout the rest of the country, and even into neighboring Argentina and Brazil.
Puerto Rico:
  • GMI is committed to working with established churches and ministries in Puerto Rico which share our common beliefs and our desire to evangelize, plant churches, and disciple future leaders in the Body of Christ. Because of this commitment, GMI is actively looking for energetic and motivated missionaries to come alongside affiliated churches and ministries on the island to further facilitate ministry efforts in such areas as: evangelism, youth ministry and outreach, theological training, development of methods for effective church planting, and practical training of Puerto Rican workers in the Body of Christ who will serve both in Puerto Rico and in other parts of the world as fellow missionaries. Understanding that finding just one person to meet all of these needs would be difficult, we would enjoy talking to anyone who is interested in any one or more of these areas of ministry.
Zambia:
  • The GMI ministry in Zambia needs missionaries to mentor and encourage pastors both in their practical, day-to-day ministry responsibilities and to help further their understanding of God’s Word and His grace. To help meet this need, GMI’s goal is to implement a regional Bible school program (already under development) which will be run by the Grace Church of Zambia.
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This article, which includes information used in a brochure for those looking to serve as missionaries under Grace Ministries International (GMI) sometime in the future, was written by Jeremy Clark, Executive Director of GMI. Jeremy and his family served as Costa Rica missionaries under GMI from December 2004 until August 2012 when he started as Executive Director. During the years prior to joining GMI, Jeremy worked in the Law Office of Garwood and Clark in Huntington, IN. During that same time he worked 3-1/2 years as a part-time deputy prosecuting attorney for the Huntington County Prosecutor’s Office. While practicing law, he also worked as a part-time youth director.

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Perhaps you are either seriously considering missions as your new vocation or you finally gave in and have made that commitment to pursue missions full-time. Now you may wonder what you can do to get prepared for such a life-changing venture. Once you apply to Grace Ministries International, you will go through different orientations, perhaps specific training geared for your ministry, and probably language studies. However, you are wanting to know what you can do before all that happens to better prepare yourself and your family to serve the Lord around the world. Maybe you have not even contacted us yet, but you still want to get ready for this next chapter in your life. Here is the best piece of advice I can give: live here and now like you will live there and then. Let me explain this by taking you through a few areas of life where you can begin to live now like you will as a missionary then.

Do Ministry Now. Serving the Lord is the Christian norm. It is not a special calling nor is it something you begin doing after you pick up your luggage in customs in your new host country. It is something you do now and forever because you are saved. Not writing to pastors or missionaries, but to everyday believers in the church at Ephesus, the Apostle Paul writes, “…walk worthy of the calling with which you were called” (Ephesians 4:1). We were called through Christ’s death and resurrection—the ultimate and only sacrifice available for our sins which had eternally separated us from God. That’s quite a calling! Not only does this implore all of us to live honorably and righteously before God in this world, but if you want to serve the Lord on the mission field, you need to practice now what you hope to do then. Are you discipling others now? Are you teaching or leading Bible studies? If you are inclined to serve or are talented at administration, how are you using these gifts for the Lord now? Do you share the gospel with others or are you waiting until you reach the field before you exercise your “calling” to do so? God desires that all men be saved (2 Timothy 2:4) and He has given us the privilege of sharing the gospel of the grace of God until He returns. Let’s take advantage of the opportunity now!

You may have a full-time job which you believe makes it nearly impossible to give much time to the Lord. Remember, when you are on the field you will be the full-time missionary encouraging people who are working 40, 50, or 60+ hours a week to give of their time to the Lord. Not only do you want to practice good ministry habits now, but it is not a bad idea to put yourself in the shoes of those local believers with whom you will be working on the field.

Practice Self-Motivation. Much of mission work requires initiative and intrinsic motivation. There usually is not going to be someone around telling us what to do or how to do it. While not all of us are leaders of others, we can all practice a degree of independence. What I mean by that is simply getting the job done as if it depends on us alone, doing it well as if no one else is looking, and seeing it through to the end. This is a skill and a work ethic which is learned and refined through practice. Here is a small example. No one told me to create this brochure. I saw the need, began the project, asked others to help, and now you are reading it!

Hand Over Ministries. If you are in ministry or doing ministry, what are you doing to hand over your areas of responsibility to others? In a practical sense, you may very well be leaving your ministry and heading to the mission field soon. So, who is going to carry it on when you leave? On another level, training others to do what you do (and even doing it better) is excellent practice for missionary life. As a missionary, the ability to train others to do a job and turn them loose to see it grow and flourish is a valid measure of success on the mission field.

Relationships. Practice good relationships now. You have all kinds of relationships at the workplace, at church, in your neighborhood, within your extended family, and in the community. When you get to the mission field your world, in a relational sense, will get a lot smaller. You may be working with only one or two other missionary families. You will not have a family network immediately available to you nor will you have that wide circle of friends you have here in the States. So, having healthy relationships is all the more important. You cannot be indifferent to your relationships on the field as we might be more inclined to do here in the States  knowing that we have other people, friends, or family members we can depend on for help or friendship. Practice treating people here as if you depended on them there. “If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men” (Romans 12:18).

Family and Marriage. The same is true for your immediate family. The missionary life will draw your family closer together in ways you never imagined. However, if you do not learn how to deal with the stresses of life as a family now, the tensions you experience on the field could also potentially have the power to pull your family apart. One valuable discipline you can practice now is serving together as a family as you would then on the field. You will get to know your spouse’s and children’s strengths and weaknesses and how to set them up for success and avoid failures.

Coming at the subject of relationships from another angle, if you are single and want to be a missionary, why would you ever date someone who has no interest in missions? You are certainly free to change your mind and decide you do not want to serve as a missionary, but if it is important to you and you think it will be for some time to come, do not settle for someone who does not share your same goal. On the flip side, if you are married and you want to be a missionary, but your spouse does not, you cannot force him or her to share your goal. All you can do is share your desire, pray, and wait.

Finances. You are not going to be rich on the mission field so practice living here as you would there. If you have debts, aggressively pay them off. Not only is debt one of the biggest impediments to people serving overseas, but by disciplining yourself to pay off your debt much sooner rather than much later, you will naturally force yourself to live on a reduced income. Even if your debts are paid off, put away as much as you can into savings. Not only is it good to save, but once again you will see just how far you are able to live below your means.

Begin to look at spending in a different light. What do I want and what do I really need? What things must I have and what things are dispensable? You may have never thought about this before. The reality is the options for clothing, food, household items, and electronics will be drastically limited by the lack of availability, different options, or the increased cost of obtaining some of them. Instead of being shocked by what you cannot purchase then, reevaluate your wants now and find out what it is you really do not need.

Health. Living on the mission field typically leads to a healthier lifestyle. You tend to eat better and exercise more if nothing else because people walk to more places than people who live in the States. Start exercising and eating healthier now. Moving, adapting to a new culture, and learning to live in new surroundings are tiring enough. Why not reduce some of the physical stress by getting into better shape now which will certainly help you then? Not to mention, being healthier now will lead to fewer physical problems down the road.

Education. Aside from the requirement to have at least one year of college-level Bible education to become a GMI missionary, you may simply want to further your biblical knowledge. If you are going to teach, you need to learn. If you are going to train, you will want to be equipped. While this applies to your knowledge of the Bible, it also applies to any other area of teaching or training you anticipate doing while on the field. Furthermore, take what you learn now and put it into practice here. You are not automatically going to become a great teacher/discipler/equipper there if you are not doing it here. Ask other mature Christians whom you know well what areas of your ministry you can improve upon or where you need to step up your game so you can serve effectively on the field. This might require additional training or more ministry experiences.

Language Studies. Education also encompasses language learning. You are not going to become fluent or conversant in a language using Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, or poring over grammar primers and vocab cards, but it is a start! If you know the language of the region where you want to serve, start learning it. Sure, you will need to go to language school, but why not make it easier by learning as much as you can now? You will develop a basic understanding of the grammar and some vocabulary which will help you acquire the language that much faster meaning that your meaningful ministry will also begin that much quicker.

Perspective. This might be the hardest thing to do now which will prepare you for life when you are on the field, but it is time to change your perspective about what really matters in life. Perhaps the easiest way to do this is by considering all things in light of your eternity with Jesus Christ and the eternity of the lost around you and around the world who do not know Him. When you do so, most other issues in life will fall into place. Paul often thought through these kinds of issues even as it pertained to his own life. He says in his letter to the Romans, “For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my countrymen according to the flesh” (Romans 9:3). Essentially, his passion for his lost Jewish countrymen was such that he wished he were the one separated from Christ, not them! From prison he writes to the Philippian Church, “But if I live on in the flesh, this will mean fruit from my labor; yet what I shall choose I cannot tell. For I am hard-pressed between the two, having a desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. Nevertheless to remain in the flesh is more needful for you” (Philippians 1:23-25). Do I want to die to be with Christ or live for the purpose of bringing others to Him or closer to Him? That is an eternal perspective.

When we think this way our possessions, income, comforts, and conveniences do not seem all that significant any more. They are no longer pursuits which drive us day to day, but Christ and His salvation for others takes preeminence in our minds. What begins to happen is that when you think in this manner you declutter your life. In essence, it becomes that much easier to pick up and go. No longer do you have the attachment to so many physical things you do not think you can part with, your routines, habits, and endeavors which might hold you back. Having an eternal perspective frees you to enjoy your heavenly citizenship (Philippians 3:19) while moving about the earth He created to share His salvation and His Word with the people He created.

Now get ready for the adventure of a lifetime!

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Below is what Milo and Raquel Seravalli, GMI Missionaries serving in Nicaragua, reported about the day the first service took place on the property:

Today was our first formal meeting on the property that God has provided for the ministry– and what we now call “Rooted” church (Arraigados).

At 3 PM we started the Children’s Club called “Come and See” (Ven y Ve). Our biggest fear was that the children who lived near our house would stop going to the group. The surprise was that all the children attended and they were joined by the children of the neighborhood San Julián where the church is located. We had a total of 60 children. There weren’t enough chairs or crafts for the children, but the leaders were able to minister to the kids. There weren’t enough cookies, but there was plenty of desire to learn about God.

At 6:30 PM we had the service for adults. Because we didn’t have enough chairs for the children, we rented 12 more; however, with 80 people, we needed about 30 more chairs. The good thing was that all those who were standing are people who ALREADY GO TO THE CHURCH – the people we have invested in for more than three years, those who already have a relationship with Jesus. They were ready to serve, some ministered to the guests, others served food, some gave their testimony in the service. There was praying, singing, caring, and giving a Bible lesson to the children – everybody loving each other.

At the end of the afternoon we saw the big list of things we need: classrooms for children, an auditorium, chairs, speakers, and microphones. But those things are the least important compared to what we already have — disciples — people ready to share their faith with others. Prayers. The Holy Spirit. The Word of God. What else do we need? The One who started the work will improve it until the final day.

The Name:

During those days we were praying for an identity for the church, and we both had in our hearts the desire to bear fruit, we found the verse Colossians 2:6-7 which says, “Therefore, as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, live in him now, rooted and built up in him, confirmed in the faith as taught, and full of gratitude. “With this they understood the importance of roots to bear fruit.” That’s why we chose the name, Rooted, for our church.

A seed sown to bear fruit:

As part of the program, we made a “time capsule.” This is a container that we filled with prayers, desires, photos, and stories of how this church started in Nagarote. We buried it and will open it again on May 20 of the year 2037 — in 20 years. A great road lies ahead.

How beautiful it is to know that God allows us to dream about the future of this church. So to see fruit we put “fertilizer” to those roots sown. We wrote a Mission, Vision, and Values, which give us a True North, an address.

The Mission: the mission of Rooted is to know, imitate, and share Jesus.

The Vision: the vision of Rooted is to evangelize the lost, edify new believers, equip disciples, and send leaders.

Our Values: we are Christocentric, bibliocentric, we pray, we disciple, we are united, we have grace, and we move in faith.

Maybe you couldn’t be here, but you are part of this church. Every prayer unites us. Every time we share what is happening in Nagarote, you do something that we cannot do from here. Thank you for being a part of the sowing of God, and if you have time, just pray and praise the Lord because of what He is doing in Nagarote.

Please enjoy the photos below!

                    

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This brief article was written by Erin Kemper, our Social Media Specialist at GMI. She was raised in Tanzania as an MK (missionary kid) along with her two sisters and a brother. 

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Ruby opened the door with a big smile and outstretched arms with hugs for all of us. She had a blanket laying over one arm, and when all six of us made it inside, her husband Herb took Dad to watch football and sat him in a nice comfy chair. Ruby handed my mom the blanket and showed her to a room for a nap and then took us four kids to the table for some fun and games. We were eventually led outside to the lawn where we could see Mt. Saint Helens. Somehow in all that time Ruby also prepared an amazing meal which I obviously remember.

This couple refreshed my family by putting themselves in each of our shoes. They gave rest and allowed their home to be used for a place to restore and renew. They encouraged us and listened. They embraced us and let us relax and be ourselves. They served us and found unique ways to minister to my family…because sometimes those in ministry need to be served too. I know my parents, my family, needed it that day, and because Herb and Ruby were sensitive to the Holy Spirit’s leading, my family got the boost they needed that day to continue the job that was before them.

I tell you about this sweet couple because I want you to realize that it doesn’t take much to make a big impact in someone’s life, specifically today talking about our missionaries’ lives. They are normal people just like you and me. They are excited about what God has called them to and they eagerly want to share about what all that entails with those who have a listening ear. But they also need rest, encouragement, and someone to be sensitive to what their particular needs might be at that time.

So, from things I remember people doing for my family, I decided to make you a list. That way, at your next church missions conference or the next time your missionary friend is on home assignment, you have a few more ideas for ways to bless them.

10 Things to Do to Encourage a Missionary on Home Assignment:

1. Give the missionary or missionary family a gift card to go out to a restaurant. If they have kids, offer to babysit while they go out.
2. Have the missionary or missionary family over for dinner (into your home) and let them rest and play games with no agenda.
3. Take a missionary out to coffee and ask the deep, hard, exciting questions with genuine care and interest.
4. Give them a little spending money to do something fun on the road. (They will spend hours driving while on home assignment.)
5. Make sure they are suited with warm coats and boots for winters or swimwear for the summer.
6. Some MKs get warn thin. During a Sunday School hour offer to take them aside and let them hang out with you instead of going to their 10th new Sunday School class.
7. If they have kids, take them to a park and just let them run, play, laugh, and “let their hair down” while the parents do whatever they want and/or need to do.
8. Take them to the movies.
9. Prepare your church family beforehand with information about the visiting missionaries and encourage people to invite them into their homes for meals, take an interest in their lives, and build relationships with them that could remain after they are gone.
10. Keep in touch after they leave with notes of encouragement, phone calls, and a plan to reconnect on their next home assignment.

NOTE: One response to an update letter from the missionary can be a huge encouragement.

Do you have ideas you would like to share with ways you have been able to bless and encourage a missionary or missionary family? We would love to hear from you at GMI! Email us at gmisocialmedia@gmail.com

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A BIG CONGRATULATIONS to Harry and Kaylah Alicea, GMI missionaries in Puerto Rico, on the birth of a baby boy on April 29!! Jairus John Alicea was born in the afternoon at 3:58pm! He is a healthy baby weighing in at 8lbs 4oz and 20in long. Harry and Kaylah are so thankful he is finally here and everyone is doing well! Welcome to the GMI Family baby Jairus!

        

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Frosty and Cathy wrote this earlier today: “The trip begins! Getting ready to board the flight to Chicago – the first leg of the journey. Good to have prayer this morning with the GMI staff and then at the airport with Craig and Pat Apel and Don TenHoeve. Thanks to everyone for your prayers and support.”

Frosty and Cathy Hansen left for Bolivia today! Please pray as they have said their goodbyes to friends and family and are traveling all the way to Bolivia. Please also pray for adjustments to their new life and ministry as it begins in Bolivia. We are excited for the wonderful things God has in store!

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Photo credit: welllebanon.org

Since the beginning of 2016 there has been a lot of activity and many changes in the GMI missionary family. People marry, babies are born, children move away, and life keeps moving forward. Have you ever been in one of those conversations with someone and you assume they are as up to date as you are and things go into a downward spiral of confusion? Been there, done that?

Well, we are going to update you on some of the happenings in the last 13 plus months of some of our missionaries’ lives:

HARRY AND KAYLAH ALICEA: Harry and Kaylah are expecting their 2nd child in just a couple of months. Their family is growing!

CHUCK AND JOY BEFUS: Chuck and Joy’s big family is getting bigger. Last month Erin married Arturo in Costa Rica and they are also expecting the addition of two grandbabies this year! Autumn is also planning a wedding for July which will add another son-in-law.

JERRY AND SANDI BOMERS: Jerry, Sandi, and their two children raised their support and arrived in Paraguay where they are excited to be serving the Lord alongside the Gularts.

JOHN AND NAOMI CAPRARI: John and Naomi went to Tanzania, had some difficulty with the pregnancy and went to South Africa for medical care. While in South Africa they ran into visa problems which wouldn’t allow them to stay until the birth of the baby, so they are now back in Grand Rapids, MI where there are excellent doctors for Naomi and excellent neonatologists should the baby decided to come early.

BRETT AND DEBBY CHAPMAN: Brett and Debby had twin boys, Ethan and Asher, on 1/26/16 and I don’t think life has slowed down for them since! They have battled some illness in their family during this last year.

FROSTY AND CATHY HANSEN: They have raised their support and are headed for Bolivia on March 6. I believe that is the quickest I have ever seen anyone raise their support!

APRIL LORENZ: April is raising her support and ideally would like to have her support in by June so she can leave for Puerto Rico early this summer. She is also engaged to be married

ERIC AND MERCY MANGO: They are anxiously awaiting the birth of baby #3 who is due in just a few months.

DAN AND MARY SUE REED: They have been working hard down in Bolivia but in the last year and a half both have lost their fathers.

TOM AND MICHELLE SANCHEZ: Tom and Michelle will be spending several months working with the national leaders in Zambia before opening the new field of Burundi, but they have to raise their financial support first.

STEVE AND BARB SHERMAN: Steve and Barb have moved to Mwanza, Tanzania, to begin new ministry there. They must settle in a new home and get used to working with a new group of people and get settled in a new church.

KENNEDY AND SOFIA SIMTOWE: Kennedy and Sofia are expanding their ministries into Mozambique in 2017.

TALO AND PATTY VERGARA: Talo married Patty in July 2016. She was a newscaster on a local Christian radio station but had wanted to be a missionary. He is finishing his commitment to CIMA International and waiting on the Lord to show them where He would have them go for future ministry.

BILL AND SUE VINTON: Bill and Sue are in the U.S. and will be in the Boston area on February 15, one day before their daughter Rachel and her husband Andrew are due to have their first baby. This will be Bill and Sue’s first grandbaby so they are pretty excited!

 

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How can we help our missionaries who are serving so far away on foreign fields? Or how about when they are in the States on home assignment? How can we show our missionaries that we really care about HOW they are doing and WHAT they are doing? There is so much information available on this topic, especially on the internet. We have whittled it down and taken some information from TEAM and used it with their permission. Now we would like to share it with you.

NINE WAYS TO HELP YOUR MISSIONARY ON THE FIELD

  1. Regular, intelligent, heartfelt prayer is your missionary’s number one need. Nothing else is as important; perhaps nothing else is harder to give on a consistent basis.
  2. Communicate regularly with your missionary. A five-minute telephone conversation may not be as expensive as you think. But check the time difference — don’t call at 3 a.m.! Send emails without an obligation to respond to every one.
  3. Send your missionary something to help celebrate the holidays: for instance, Thanksgiving napkins or Christmas placemats.
  4. Birthday cards are very important, especially for children. Mark your calendar to send cards far enough in advance to get there on time (but late is better than never!).
  5. Visit your first-termer, or send your pastor or missions chairperson. Always give advance notice and don’t stay too long. Remember that your missionary is busy and can’t always drop everything and act as your tour guide. And do leave a monetary gift to cover the cost of your stay.
  6. Read your missionary’s e-mails and prayer letters thoughtfully. Is he lonely? Is she discouraged? Then send an encouraging note and refer to items mentioned in previous letters.
  7. Send money at Christmas for something “extra” or for your missionary’s vacation. A few days away at a quiet spot will do wonders for his outlook and ministry!
  8. Send gifts that can’t be obtained on that field. Favorite foods, videos of football games, or the latest books in English you can gift through Kindle can be a treat. How about a magazine subscription they would really appreciate that they could get online? If you choose to send something, please check with the missionary first about duty charges and whether it is wise to send them packages. Sometimes you may know someone going to visit them who would be willing to take something small.
  9. Music is appreciated. Remember the ages of your MKs and select music they would enjoy. Recordings of familiar hymns and contemporary worship songs will help your missionary teach his children the basics of North American worship.

 

EIGHT WAYS TO HELP YOUR MISSIONARY AT HOME

  1. During home assignment, give your missionary your friendship. Share what God has done in your life and what you are doing in service for Him. Make a consistent effort to encourage and nurture your missionary’s personal spiritual growth.
  2. Help with the transition back into North American life. Assist with signing up children for school. Offer your name as the “secondary emergency contact” person for school or events. Suggest good places to shop or explain optional activities for children such as library reading hours and the Little League.
  3. Plan a shopping trip. After several years away, your missionary may need to update his wardrobe. Why not treat her to a new outfit? It is particularly important that MKs have clothes to fit in with their peers.
  4. Provide some R & R. Do you have a “get away” spot (cabin, cottage, trailer, in-law apartment) that you could make available for a few days for your missionary? Traveling from place to place while on home assignment can be stressful.
  5. Provide a list of area resources such as reputable doctors, good places to shop, fun places to take the kids, babysitters, beauticians, and barbers. It has probably taken you years to build up a list of places where you do business. Why not share that resource with your missionary?
  6. Can you make your car available for your missionary? A reliable car that will take your missionary over miles of home assignment travel is a gift of peace of mind.
  7. Reorient your missionary to your local church. Lots of faces have changed since your missionary was last there. Make sure you and others connect with your missionary not only in church but also in informal gatherings outside of church. Having a party? Invite your missionary!
  8. Most of all, pray. Wasn’t that already mentioned? For a missionary in the heat of spiritual battle, nothing is more encouraging than to be told, “I pray for you every day.”

 

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